Search results for

"Adaptive Reuse"

Van-Brodie-Mill-Lawrence-MA

LAWRENCE, MASS. — An affiliate of Trinity Financial has received $17.1 million in financing for the development of an affordable housing community in Lawrence. MassHousing has provided a $14 million conduit bridge loan, $1.2 million in permanent financing and $1.9 million in workforce housing funds for the project. Trinity Financial will transform the former Van Brodie Mill into a 102-unit mixed-income housing community. Designed by ICON Architecture, the property will contain eight studio apartments, 25 one-bedroom apartments, 56 two-bedroom apartments and 13 three-bedroom apartments. Aberthaw Construction is the contractor and Trinity Management will manage the completed property. The adaptive reuse project will preserve the historic former mill, while remediating a brownfield site. Constructed in 1919 by the Arlington Mills company, the Van Brodie Mill originally manufactured yarn for wool and flannel. By the 1950s, the Arlington Mills company has closed and the Van Brodie Mill was operated by a company that shifted production to food products, including packaged breakfast cereals and rations for the military.

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ATLANTA — Granite Properties has formed a long-term partnership with Third & Urban for the recapitalization and development of two warehouse properties in Atlanta’s West Midtown district. The partnership will create a portfolio to include the recapitalization of Complex, an adaptive reuse project Third & Urban unveiled in December 2016. The building is 80 percent leased to tenants including Proof of the Pudding, Bold Monk Brewing, Look Listen and LTX Solutions. The project is on track to be fully leased by June. In addition, the partnership will acquire and develop a group of warehouses located at 1218 and 1236 Menlo Drive, also in the West Midtown district. Similar to Complex, the new development — dubbed Inland Tract — will offer creative flex space for tenants that need both office and warehouse space.

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ORANGE, CALIF. — Chapman University has received approval for the adaptive reuse of a historic packing house. The university will develop a 402-bed student housing community adjacent to its campus in Orange. The historic Villa Park Orchards Association Packing House will be converted into a museum, student services center and classrooms or offices for the university. The new student housing development will target upperclassmen, and is being designed to reflect the character of the packing house and the surrounding community. The project’s designers are Togawa Smith Martin Inc. and AC Martin. KTGY Architecture + Planning is the university’s design advisor and project representative, and has helped to ensure project consistency, coordinate with various design firms, provide design recommendations and shepherd the project through the approval process. Additional details and a planned completion date have yet to be announced.

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The Detroit metropolitan area has experienced significant economic growth in recent years, fueled by a strengthening auto industry as well as the continued diversification of the local employment landscape. The hotel sector is benefitting from existing employers expanding operations locally and new entrants to the market. The Big Three automakers continue to invest in the region, while companies like e-commerce giant Amazon.com Inc. are building large warehouse facilities. Revenue gains for hotels were accordingly robust during the 2010–2016 period. Revenue per available room (RevPAR) during that stretch grew nearly 71 percent, rising from a low of roughly $38 in 2009 at the depths of the Great Recession to over $64 by year-end 2016. Both the average daily rate (ADR) and occupancy have posted consistent gains since 2010. Moreover, hoteliers sold a record number of room nights in the city of Detroit in 2016, according to STR. Occupancy levels approached 70 percent by the end of 2016, with ADRs of nearly $150 in the central business district (CBD). The data for 2017 show a relatively stable occupancy level with robust gains in ADR. The record performance achieved in this expansionary period has spurred tremendous hotel development in the downtown core and …

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A decade ago, the Atlanta retail market was a house of cards. It was clear to see this if you were in the industry at the time, and possibly even if you weren’t. Based on the intense overbuilding that had taken place, it wouldn’t have taken a worldwide economic meltdown to wreck it, though that didn’t help. Literally hundreds of unanchored retail centers had cropped up all over suburbia, fitting directly into everything that people consider to be negative about shopping centers. The formula for developers was to scrape every tree from a piece of land, cover it with asphalt and an inexpensively constructed building, then fill it with whatever tenants they could find. The result was largely a glut of properties with poor intrinsic values: mid-block sites, odd shaped layouts, challenging access, uninspired, non-credit tenants with high rents. This would, of course, turn out to be unsustainable. To be fair, not every property was developed in this fashion. Atlanta was and still is home to many excellent retail developers that know how to create amazing projects. But many look back to the 2000s in Atlanta as a time of cookie cutter development with inexperienced builders playing a game of …

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HOUSTON — Hall Structured Finance (HSF), a Dallas-based private lender, has secured a $22.8 million construction loan to finance the adaptive reuse of the former Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. office building in downtown Houston into a 150-room Hyatt Place hotel. The new hotel will feature ground-floor dining, a rooftop bar, indoor pool, fitness center and approximately 800 square feet of meeting space. Guestrooms, which will be located on the third through 16th floors, will average about 400 square feet per room. A timetable for completion of the project has not yet been established.

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Wells Fargo Center, Portland, Ore.

PORTLAND, ORE. — Starwood Capital Group has purchased the 40-story Wells Fargo Center in downtown Portland. The transaction includes an adjacent five-story former data processing building. The price was not disclosed, though county tax records put the value of the tower at $163 million and the adjacent property at $33 million, according to The Oregonian. In June, Wells Fargo announced plans to sell the buildings and relocate some of the 900 employees working there to other local offices, added The Oregonian. The two structures total 725,000 square feet. The asset is located at 1300 SW 5th Ave. The Class A creative office space is the tallest building in Oregon. It offers views of Mt. Hood, the Willamette River, Mount St. Helens, downtown Portland and the West Hills. Starwood plans to reposition the property into a premier Class A asset. The lobbies and entries will undergo major renovations. The investment firm will also add new tenant amenities, including conference facilities, a tenant lounge, reimagined retail areas, fitness center and bike hub. “We are confident that our ambitious renovation plans will restore this building to its former status as one of the most iconic Class A office towers not just in Portland, …

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LONG BEACH, CALIF. — Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) has completed Immanuel Place, an affordable seniors housing community in the Bluff Heights Historic District of Long Beach. The $12 million project converted the 90-year-old Immanuel Church into a 31,000-square-foot, 25-unit community. Thomas Safran & Associates developed the property. The adaptive reuse project preserved the church’s stained-glass windows, pipe organ and three-story sanctuary. The development also moved an adjacent home to another area of Long Beach, making room for a parking lot. Immanuel Place was financed through a combination of Low Income Housing Tax Credit equity from Union Bank, an Infill Grant from the California State Department of Housing and Community Development, a loan from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), HOME Investment Partnership Program funds from the City of Long Beach/The Long Beach Community Investment Co., a loan from the Community Development Commission of the County of Los Angeles and funds from the Federal Home Loan Bank. KFA is an architecture and design firm specializing in urban infill and adaptive reuse projects. The company is based in Santa Monica, Calif.

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ST. LOUIS — Dwight Capital has provided a $63.1 million loan for the refinancing of Park Pacific Apartments in St. Louis. The property is an adaptive reuse of the historic Missouri Pacific Railroad building located downtown. Originally built in the 1920s, the property was rehabilitated into a mixed-use development in 2011. Park Pacific now features 230 luxury apartments, 48,000 square feet of Class A office space, 28,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space and a 585-space parking garage. Adam Sasouness and Josh Hoffman of Dwight Capital originated the 40-year loan. The borrower, The Lawrence Group, will use about $300,000 of the funds to improve the energy efficiency of the property.

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The Charlotte economy has created jobs at a faster rate than the national average throughout this cycle. With 34,900 new jobs over the last 12 months and more than 110,000 over the last three years, the regional job market has created a new demand for the luxury multifamily inventory throughout infill and select suburban submarkets. Four of the MSA’s top five employers — Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Carolinas HealthCare System and Novant Health — each have a combined 1,000-plus job openings in Charlotte, while AXA, Red Ventures, Dimensional Fund Advisors and CompuCom have begun major expansions across the metro area. This has created a need for additional multifamily inventory, which has expanded by 7,700 units over the last 12 months, while absorption was just shy of 7,000. The modest downtick in occupancy was more than offset by a 4 percent same-store rent growth (30 basis points higher than the five-year trailing average of 3.7 percent). Two marquee high-rise projects are nearing completion in the central business district’s Third Ward: Greystar’s Ascent and Childress Klein’s Museum Tower. The early returns show unprecedented per square foot rents for the metro area. In most infill locations, developers are offering one month free …

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